women’s equality day

women's equality in 2015

 

a few days from now, we’ll celebrate women’s equality day. the day was originally pronounced on august 26, 1920 when women were granted the right to vote. since then, women have gained many more rights, including both those that are explicit and implicit. and in the 95 years since that day, there’s been so much to celebrate. so where are we now?

 

voting: women and men are equal here in the US. everyone is allowed to vote, as long as they’re 18 years of age or older, are not incarcerated, and are legal citizens. in fact, approximately 53% of the voters in the last major US election were women (!!). although there are still a large number of people who do not vote, this is a great feat and one that actually surprised me. women in the Vatican and Saudi Arabia are still not allowed to vote.

 

financial: women have the same rights as men in the US. this is not true in a few other countries around the world, where men have all of the financial decision rights. what can we do to change this? find ways to give women the financial knowledge and tools to manage their own finances. knowledge is power. thankfully, there are organizations that are starting to sprout up in order to fix this, although I’m still looking for one that really kick butt and stands out (send some suggestions over to me if you have them!).

 

workplace: yes, women have equal rights. no, these are not always exercised. unfortunately, even though it is the law to pay men and women the same, to treat them the same, and to promote them the same, it is not always the case. this particular category of “women’s rights in the workplace” is likely a lot more controversial than the other categories simply because there is some subjective standpoints that are hard to avoid. part of the bias against women in the workplace is reliant on time – laws can only fix the material issues, but internal bias will take a long time to undo. the other part is something all of us women have the ability to help change. for example, do you make sure to #AskForMore? if not, start now. men do this regularly and if women did it just as much, we’d likely be much farther along.

 
no matter how annoying some of the bias against women at work can be, I’m so thankful to be a part of today’s generation, reaping the benefits of the hard work from women who came before us. there’s a lot more to do, and a lot of it is influenced by what we as women do. keep the positive change going, #AskForMore, and show the world how awesome women are by making a difference in this big, wide world.

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